Max Bond, 1935-2009

Bond
More sad news from the world of architecture: Max Bond died yesterday at age 74. Bond was one of the most prominent African-American architects, working for forty years in New York City at his firm Davis Brody Bond Aedas. Educated in the classrooms at Harvard and streets of Paris while on a Fulbright, Bond was responsible for the Studio Museum of Harlem, the expansion of the Harvard Club, and the Bolgatanga Library in Ghana. Most recently he had been the co-designer (along with Michael Arad) of the World Trade Center Memorial Museum.

Thanks to Matt Chaban at the Architect’s Newspaper for the news about Bond.

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1 Comment

  1. Max Bond inspired me to believe that Architecture is Revolution and I studied architecture at City College while he was the Dean. He was an eloquent man who pursued architecture with spirit in a time where architecture was most difficult. He was one of the most reasonable educators focused on the student, the process and truly enjoyed teaching and architecture.
    He was a wonderful soul and was indeed the most influential African American Architect. My class of 1991 and those who knew him at City as Dean still smile when we talk about him. I remember first meeting him when I was deciding to go to City College and having a long conversation about choices and the importance of making architecture a life path focused on change and revolution. A quiet radical, he made you think about life and boundaries, about the importance of having a perspective, an opinion and approach to architecture.
    I was fortunate to have him on several architectural critiques at school and also fortunate to work for him on the Audubon Biomedical Science and Technology Park after coming out of graduate school. I was also fortunate to be able to call him periodically just to talk and sometimes laugh. I still remember him in North Carolina at a conference talking about transitioning your practice to the next generation…Always a thinker, he was vibrant and focused.
    He will be truly missed.
    I have called Davis Brody Bond, 212-633-4700 – to add my name to the list – as a service for him has not yet been announced. I will also suggest you do the same.
    Atim Annette Oton

    Like

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